2019 Boston Webinar Series

Welcome!

Click the “play” button below to access (or re-watch) the webinar.

Meb Keflezighi – 2014 Boston Marathon Champion

>>>> UPDATE: Due to constant spam, the question and answer section has been moved the McMillan Boston Facebook group. Just click on this link. <<<<<

BOSTON WEEKEND MEET UP:

I can’t wait to see you in Boston. Here are all the activities I have planned to help you get race ready.

SATURDAY, APRIL 13, 2019
9:00am – McMillan Shake-out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map)
2:00pm – How to Race Boston Course Preview: In this clinic, I’ll walk you through the course and how to best race it. Invaluable for a great Boston run. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map) Sign up here to attend.
3:00pm (NOTE time change) – McMillan Shake-out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map)

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2019
9:00am – McMillan Shake-Out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: McMillan House (map)
2:00pm – How to Race Boston Course Preview: In this clinic, I’ll walk you through the course and how to best race it. Invaluable for a great Boston run. Location: McMillan House (mapRSVP please.
4:00pm – McMillan Shake-Out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: McMillan House (map)

MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2019
Boston Marathon Day!
4:00pm-6:00pm – Post-race party/drop-in. Drop by so we can celebrate your race! Location: McMillan House (map) RSVP please.

Our Sponsor:

A big thanks to UCAN for their support of this year’s webinar series. UCAN is my go-to sports nutrition product. You can use their products to help you recover quickly from training (Meb talks about using it in this way). You can use their products to provide excellent pre-run nutrition when you need fuel but there is no time to eat (Sarah Sellers uses it in this way). You can use it as a meal replacement shake when trying to reduce calories, but still want to get in fuel for your running. And, you can use their products as your marathon fuel so you have steady energy and avoid the spike/crash and upset GI system of gels and sports drinks.

 

Get started with a special UCAN Run Boston Starter Pack and Save 50%: https://www.generationucan.com/product/ucan-run-boston-starter-pack/

 


One Week to Go!!

>>>> UPDATE: Due to constant spam, the question and answer section has been moved the McMillan Boston Facebook group. Just click on this link. <<<<<

BOSTON WEEKEND MEET UP:

I can’t wait to see you in Boston. Here are all the activities I have planned to help you get race ready.

SATURDAY, APRIL 13, 2019
9:00am – McMillan Shake-out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map)
2:00pm – How to Race Boston Course Preview: In this clinic, I’ll walk you through the course and how to best race it. Invaluable for a great Boston run. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map) Sign up here to attend.
3:00pm (NOTE time change) – McMillan Shake-out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map)

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2019
9:00am – McMillan Shake-Out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: McMillan House (map)
2:00pm – How to Race Boston Course Preview: In this clinic, I’ll walk you through the course and how to best race it. Invaluable for a great Boston run. Location: McMillan House (mapRSVP please.
4:00pm – McMillan Shake-Out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: McMillan House (map)

MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2019
Boston Marathon Day!
4:00pm-6:00pm – Post-race party/drop-in. Drop by so we can celebrate your race! Location: McMillan House (map) RSVP please.

Resources:

Surviving the Marathon Freak-out Book

Yoga Recovery Routine

The Runner’s Guide to Ice Baths

Our Sponsor:

A big thanks to UCAN for their support of this year’s webinar series. UCAN is my go-to sports nutrition product. You can use their products to help you recover quickly from training (Meb talks about using it in this way). You can use their products to provide excellent pre-run nutrition when you need fuel but there is no time to eat (Sarah Sellers uses it in this way). You can use it as a meal replacement shake when trying to reduce calories, but still want to get in fuel for your running. And, you can use their products as your marathon fuel so you have steady energy and avoid the spike/crash and upset GI system of gels and sports drinks.

 

Get started with a special UCAN Run Boston Starter Pack and Save 50%: https://www.generationucan.com/product/ucan-run-boston-starter-pack/

 


Two Weeks to Go!!

>>>> UPDATE: Due to constant spam, the question and answer section has been moved the McMillan Boston Facebook group. Just click on this link. <<<<<

BOSTON WEEKEND MEET UP:

I can’t wait to see you in Boston. Here are all the activities I have planned to help you get race ready.

SATURDAY, APRIL 13, 2019
9:00am – McMillan Shake-out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map)
2:00pm – How to Race Boston Course Preview: In this clinic, I’ll walk you through the course and how to best race it. Invaluable for a great Boston run. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map) Sign up here to attend.
3:30pm – McMillan Shake-out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map)

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2019
9:00am – McMillan Shake-Out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: McMillan House (map)
2:00pm – How to Race Boston Course Preview: In this clinic, I’ll walk you through the course and how to best race it. Invaluable for a great Boston run. Location: McMillan House (mapRSVP please.
4:00pm – McMillan Shake-Out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: McMillan House (map)

MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2019
Boston Marathon Day!
4:00pm-6:00pm – Post-race party/drop-in. Drop by so we can celebrate your race! Location: McMillan House (map) RSVP please.

Resources:

Surviving the Marathon Freak-out Book

McMillan’s Marathon Daily To Do List
In the 14 days before your race, do the task listed for that day.
14 Review flight and hotel reservations.
13 Locate entry confirmation and put in safe spot where you will remember it on your travel to race.
12 Make your initial packing list and buy supplies you will need. Lube, Band-Aids, nutrition products, gear are common purchases.
11 Research and make pre-race dinner reservations.
10 Begin to watch the weather forecast and adjust packing list accordingly. Better to over pack and not need something than to not have it.
9 Make a list of your most awesome runs you did during the marathon training. Remind yourself of how well you can run and how mentally strong you are.
8 Review starting corral schematics, course map and elevation chart. Watch YouTube videos of race to begin to visualize the race.
7 Finalize shoes and gear selection.
6 Finalize nutrition plan – 2-3 days before race, day before race, morning of race, during race, post race.
5 Re-read your list of awesome workouts.
4 Check weather forecast.
3 Spread out all your gear and pack systematically. Start with skin (lube, Band-Aids) and move outward. Pack race gear/nutrition first then warm-up gear then post-race gear then casual clothing.
2 Think about how grateful you are to be running. To be able to race. Others are not so lucky.
1 Pick up bib number, visit expo (no camping out), carve out time for relaxing, add diversion (movie is good) if thinking too much about race.
0 Race Day! Smile & enjoy

Our Sponsor:

A big thanks to UCAN for their support of this year’s webinar series. UCAN is my go-to sports nutrition product. You can use their products to help you recover quickly from training (Meb talks about using it in this way). You can use their products to provide excellent pre-run nutrition when you need fuel but there is no time to eat (Sarah Sellers uses it in this way). You can use it as a meal replacement shake when trying to reduce calories, but still want to get in fuel for your running. And, you can use their products as your marathon fuel so you have steady energy and avoid the spike/crash and upset GI system of gels and sports drinks.

 

Get started with a special UCAN Run Boston Starter Pack and Save 50%: https://www.generationucan.com/product/ucan-run-boston-starter-pack/

 


Dathan Ritzenhein

>>>> UPDATE: Due to constant spam, the question and answer section has been moved the McMillan Boston Facebook group. Just click on this link. <<<<<

BOSTON WEEKEND MEET UP:

I can’t wait to see you in Boston. Here are all the activities I have planned to help you get race ready.

SATURDAY, APRIL 13, 2019
9:00am – McMillan Shake-out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map)
2:00pm – How to Race Boston Course Preview: In this clinic, I’ll walk you through the course and how to best race it. Invaluable for a great Boston run. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map) Sign up here to attend.
3:30pm – McMillan Shake-out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map)

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2019
9:00am – McMillan Shake-Out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: McMillan House (map)
2:00pm – How to Race Boston Course Preview: In this clinic, I’ll walk you through the course and how to best race it. Invaluable for a great Boston run. Location: McMillan House (map)
4:00pm – McMillan Shake-Out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: McMillan House (map)

MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2019
Boston Marathon Day!
4:00pm-6:00pm – Post-race party/drop-in. Drop by so we can celebrate your race! Location: McMillan House (map) RSVP please.

Our Sponsor:

A big thanks to UCAN for their support of this year’s webinar series. UCAN is my go-to sports nutrition product. You can use their products to help you recover quickly from training (Meb talks about using it in this way). You can use their products to provide excellent pre-run nutrition when you need fuel but there is no time to eat (Sarah Sellers uses it in this way). You can use it as a meal replacement shake when trying to reduce calories, but still want to get in fuel for your running. And, you can use their products as your marathon fuel so you have steady energy and avoid the spike/crash and upset GI system of gels and sports drinks.

 

Get started with a special UCAN Run Boston Starter Pack and Save 50%: https://www.generationucan.com/product/ucan-run-boston-starter-pack/

 


Desiree Linden – 2018 Boston Marathon Champion

>>>> UPDATE: Due to constant spam, the question and answer section has been moved the McMillan Boston Facebook group. Just click on this link. <<<<<

BOSTON WEEKEND MEET UP:

I can’t wait to see you in Boston. Here are all the activities I have planned to help you get race ready.

SATURDAY, APRIL 13, 2019
9:30am – McMillan Shake-out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map)
2:00pm – How to Race Boston Course Preview: In this clinic, I’ll walk you through the course and how to best race it. Invaluable for a great Boston run. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map) Sign up here to attend.
4:30pm – McMillan Shake-out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: Sheraton Boston Hotel, Republic Ballroom (map)

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2019
9:00am – McMillan Shake-Out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: McMillan House (map)
2:00pm – How to Race Boston Course Preview: In this clinic, I’ll walk you through the course and how to best race it. Invaluable for a great Boston run. Location: McMillan House (map)
4:00pm – McMillan Shake-Out Run: Join me for an easy 20-30 minute jog on the Charles River Path. Location: McMillan House (map)

MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2019
Boston Marathon Day!
4:00pm-6:00pm – Post-race party/drop-in. Drop by so we can celebrate your race! Location: McMillan House (map) RSVP please.

Our Sponsor:

A big thanks to UCAN for their support of this year’s webinar series. UCAN is my go-to sports nutrition product. You can use their products to help you recover quickly from training (Meb talks about using it in this way). You can use their products to provide excellent pre-run nutrition when you need fuel but there is no time to eat (Sarah Sellers uses it in this way). You can use it as a meal replacement shake when trying to reduce calories, but still want to get in fuel for your running. And, you can use their products as your marathon fuel so you have steady energy and avoid the spike/crash and upset GI system of gels and sports drinks.

 

Get started with a special UCAN Run Boston Starter Pack and Save 50%: https://www.generationucan.com/product/ucan-run-boston-starter-pack/

 


One Month to Go! Webinar: March 12, 2019

UPDATE: Due to constant spam, the question and answer section has been moved the McMillan Boston Facebook group. Just click on this link.

Our Sponsor:

A big thanks to UCAN for their support of this year’s webinar series. UCAN is my go-to sports nutrition product. You can use their products to help you recover quickly from training (Meb talks about using it in this way). You can use their products to provide excellent pre-run nutrition when you need fuel but there is no time to eat (Sarah Sellers uses it in this way). You can use it as a meal replacement shake when trying to reduce calories, but still want to get in fuel for your running. And, you can use their products as your marathon fuel so you have steady energy and avoid the spike/crash and upset GI system of gels and sports drinks.

 

Get started with a special UCAN Run Boston Starter Pack and Save 50%: https://www.generationucan.com/product/ucan-run-boston-starter-pack/

 

Webinar Resources:

Fixing the Fade  – 3 ways I help runners who, despite smart training and good nutrition, continue to fade at the end of marathons.

The Marathon Long Run – You learn about the two essentials types of long runs for marathoners.

Long Run How-To Video – More detail on the fast finish long run.

Speed Work for Marathoners – Add some fast running to your marathon training.

The McMillan Running Calculator – Insert your tune-up race results to predict your marathon time.

Fueling Strategies for the Marathon – Learn about the 3 common types of marathon fueling routines.

3 Great Marathon Predictor Workouts – Details on how to run a Yasso 800 workout.

Progression Runs – Full detail on different types of progression runs.

The McMillan Boston Training Series – This series of articles walks you through my training for Boston.

McMillan Boston Training Plans – I built my downhill marathon plans specifically for the unique Boston course. Access them via the McMillan Run Team (free trial here).



Win the Day with Dr. Jerry Lynch

If you have questions, either during the webinar or while watching the replay, just post them as a comment below and I’ll answer them as quickly as I can.

Our Sponsor:

A big thanks to UCAN for their support of this year’s webinar series. UCAN is my go-to sports nutrition product. You can use their products to help you recover quickly from training (Meb talks about using it in this way). You can use their products to provide excellent pre-run nutrition when you need fuel but there is no time to eat (Sarah Sellers uses it in this way). You can use it as a meal replacement shake when trying to reduce calories, but still want to get in fuel for your running. And, you can use their products as your marathon fuel so you have steady energy and avoid the spike/crash and upset GI system of gels and sports drinks.

 

Get started with a special UCAN Run Boston Starter Pack and Save 50%: https://www.generationucan.com/product/ucan-run-boston-starter-pack/

Recommended Reading:

Jerry Lynch Books – Read his books!

 


 

Boston Marathon Champion Amby Burfoot

If you have questions, either during the webinar or while watching the replay, just post them as a comment below and I’ll answer them as quickly as I can.

Our Sponsor:

A big thanks to UCAN for their support of this year’s webinar series. UCAN is my go-to sports nutrition product. You can use their products to help you recover quickly from training (Meb talks about using it in this way). You can use their products to provide excellent pre-run nutrition when you need fuel but there is no time to eat (Sarah Sellers uses it in this way). You can use it as a meal replacement shake when trying to reduce calories, but still want to get in fuel for your running. And, you can use their products as your marathon fuel so you have steady energy and avoid the spike/crash and upset GI system of gels and sports drinks.

 

Get started with a special UCAN Run Boston Starter Pack and Save 50%: https://www.generationucan.com/product/ucan-run-boston-starter-pack/

Recommended Reading:

Amby Burfoot Books – Read his books!

 


Two Months to Go! Webinar: February 12, 2019

If you have questions, either during the webinar or while watching the replay, just post them as a comment below and I’ll answer them as quickly as I can.

Our Sponsor:

A big thanks to UCAN for their support of this year’s webinar series. UCAN is my go-to sports nutrition product. You can use their products to help you recover quickly from training (Meb talks about using it in this way). You can use their products to provide excellent pre-run nutrition when you need fuel but there is no time to eat (Sarah Sellers uses it in this way). You can use it as a meal replacement shake when trying to reduce calories, but still want to get in fuel for your running. And, you can use their products as your marathon fuel so you have steady energy and avoid the spike/crash and upset GI system of gels and sports drinks.

 

Get started with a special UCAN Run Boston Starter Pack and Save 50%: https://www.generationucan.com/product/ucan-run-boston-starter-pack/

Suggested Workouts:

In the webinar, I will mention the usual rhythm of the weekend long run over the last 8 weeks – alternating between a long run for time/distance and a fast finish long run. I also will mention the mid-week workouts and wanted to provide some examples that you can insert into your plan. Add 1-2 depending on your experience level and injury history to your week in addition to your weekend long run. Choose the ones that look fun and will build the fitness you feel you are lacking or will need for the race.  Paces should come from the McMillan Running Calculator.

Leg Speed: 20-30 minute Warm-Up + Stride Workout: 8 to 10 times 15 seconds starting at 5K and progressing down to Mile race effort with 1 minute recovery jog between + 20-30 minute Cool-down

VO2max (short): 20-30 minute Warm-Up + Fartlek Workout: 12 to 15 times 1 minute at slightly faster than 5K effort with 1 minute recovery jog + 20-30 minute Cool-down. NOTE: Choose a course where you can run the faster segments on a slight (1-2%) decline.

VO2max (long): 20-30 minute Warm-Up + Speed Workout: 6 to 8 x 800m with 400m recovery jog plus 3 x 200m Strides with 200m recovery jog + 20-30 minute Cool-down

Stamina/Threshold (Tempo Run): 20 minute Warm-Up + Tempo Run: 20-30 minutes + 20 minute Cool-down

Stamina/Threshold (Tempo Intervals):  20-30 minute Warm-Up + 2-3 x 2 miles (3 km)  with 2-3 minutes recovery jog + 1-2 mile Cool-Down

Stamina/Threshold (Cruise Intervals):  20-30 minute Warm-Up + 6-8 x 1000m  with 1 minute recovery jog + 1-2 mile Cool-Down

Hill Workout: 15-25 minute Warm-Up + Up & Downhill Repeats: 4-6 times a moderately sloped uphill (6-8% grade) at 5k effort or harder lasting 60 to 75 seconds with the jog back down the hill as recovery + 6-8 times a moderately sloped downhill (1-3% decline grade) lasting 20-40 seconds at half-marathon effort with jog back up the hill as recovery + 15-25 minute Cool-down

Goal Pace Run: Goal Pace Workout: 1-2 mile Warm-Up + 6-8 miles (10-12 km) at Goal Pace + 1-2 mile Cool-Down

Webinar Resources:

Fixing the Fade  – 3 ways I help runners who, despite smart training and good nutrition, continue to fade at the end of marathons.

The Marathon Long Run – You learn about the two essentials types of long runs for marathoners.

Long Run How-To Video – More detail on the fast finish long run.

Speed Work for Marathoners – Add some fast running to your marathon training.

The McMillan Running Calculator – Insert your tune-up race results to predict your marathon time.

Fueling Strategies for the Marathon – Learn about the 3 common types of marathon fueling routines.

3 Great Marathon Predictor Workouts – Details on how to run a Yasso 800 workout.

Progression Runs – Full detail on different types of progression runs.

The McMillan Boston Training Series – This series of articles walks you through my training for Boston.

McMillan Boston Training Plans – I built my downhill marathon plans specifically for the unique Boston course. Access them via the McMillan Run Team (free trial here).

 


 

Runner Nutrition with Matt Fitzgerald

Webinar Resources:

Matt Fitzgerald’s Books – Includes the book we talked about, Racing Weight.

Diet Quality Score App – Available for both iOS and Android.

Racing Weight Estimator – Calculate your optimal racing weight.

 

The McMillan Boston Training Series – This series of articles walks you through my training for Boston.

McMillan Boston Training Plans – I built my downhill marathon plans specifically for the unique Boston course. Access them via the McMillan Run Team (free trial here).


3 Months to Go till Boston!

If you have questions, either during the webinar or while watching the replay, just post them as a comment below and I’ll answer them as quickly as I can.

Our Sponsor:

A big thanks to UCAN for their support of this year’s webinar series. UCAN is my go-to sports nutrition product. You can use their products to help you recover quickly from training (Meb talks about using it in this way). You can use their products to provide excellent pre-run nutrition when you need fuel but there is no time to eat (Sarah Sellers uses it in this way). You can use it as a meal replacement shake when trying to reduce calories, but still want to get in fuel for your running. And, you can use their products as your marathon fuel so you have steady energy and avoid the spike/crash and upset GI system of gels and sports drinks.

 

Get started with a special UCAN Run Boston Starter Pack and Save 50%: https://www.generationucan.com/product/ucan-run-boston-starter-pack/

Webinar Resources:

The Marathon Long Run – You learn about the two essentials types of long runs for marathoners.

Long Run How-To Video – More detail on the fast finish long run.

Speed Work for Marathoners – Add some fast running to your marathon training.

The McMillan Running Calculator – Insert your tune-up race results to predict your marathon time.

Fueling Strategies for the Marathon – Learn about the 3 common types of marathon fueling routines.

5 Proven Marathon Long Runs – Includes the recommend Squire’s long run.

3 Great Marathon Predictor Workouts – Details on how to run a Yasso 800 workout.

Progression Runs – Full detail on different types of progression runs.

The McMillan Boston Training Series – This series of articles walks you through my training for Boston.

McMillan Boston Training Plans – I built my downhill marathon plans specifically for the unique Boston course. Access them via the McMillan Run Team (free trial here).

 

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46 Comments. Leave new

  • Hi, Where do I ask questions or do I see the questions of other people in webinar # 1, does not give me the option? Thank you

  • Greg McMillan
    January 16, 2019 6:03 am

    Webinar guests: This is the area where you can ask your questions. You’ll post your question in the Comment section below and I’ll reply to you with my answer.

  • Hills or speed training first?

  • Which comes first, hills or speed training? Thank you

  • 1. At 3 months is it valid to do long runs on uphill and downhill terrain? or in the mountains? 2. If i am programmed for example 15-17 miles if I run on a mountain, I should do less miles and slower than scheduled. 3.Next Sunday I’m going to run 17 miles and I’m going to rehearse UCAN. 3 hours before I will have the usual breakfast and one hour before the training I will have a drink from UCAN. It is necessary to take another drink of UCAN after one hour of training ?. To hydrate in these 17 miles with water only? to avoid mixing moisturizer with UCAN ?, I hope you understand my English. Thank you!

    • Greg McMillan
      January 17, 2019 8:23 am

      Sure. Most early long runs in the marathon cycle are just for “time on the feet” so you can focus on simply being out there for time and if running on severe terrain, you can focus on the duration of the run (how long it would take you to run 15-17 miles on normal terrain) instead of the distance. I wouldn’t do this for every long run as you do want to also get in the miles but alternating between a hill/mountainous long run and a regular distance-oriented long run could work well.

      With UCAN, the initial recommendation is to dose every hour during the run and then modify for your next runs based on how you feel. Hydration can come from water and electrolytes during the run.

  • Thanks , excelent!!

  • I have been alternating “time on feet” long runs with “fast finish” long runs. In addition to a build in distance, should the pace of each type of long run get progressively faster over the course of a marathon build so that the average gets closer to (albeit always remaining slower than) goal marathon pace?

    Also, elites like Kipchoge seem to do their long runs at something approaching a tempo pace, whereas the rest of us mortals usually do our long runs at a much slower “easy” pace. Are there any takeaways from this inversion, or should us mortals simply accept that this works for Kipchoge because his longest runs are over in 2 hours, whereas most of the rest of us are still out there for an extra hour!

    • Greg McMillan
      January 20, 2019 8:16 am

      For long runs that are just done for time/distance, I would not try to push the pace faster. Instead, a faster pace should just come naturally. Pace may fluctuate based on how you are feeling. For example, later in your training, you may be more tired so your long run for time/distance will be slower but that’s not reflective of your fitness but more the fatigue from the training. Push the pace on these long runs and you will be overtraining.

      Fast finish long runs are ones where you definitely hope to increase your pace in the last 1-4 miles. The middle portion is at marathon pace (for pace practice) but the last 1-4 miles are where you can push the pace to boost mental toughness, leg strength and carbohydrate depletion (to stimulate greater storage).

    • Greg McMillan
      January 20, 2019 8:34 am

      It is a common mistake to interpret Kipchoge’s training based on the terminology they use for their runs. For example, in the data we have from his last 5 weeks of training, he calls his long runs “tempo” runs but that is not the same use of the word “tempo” in our terminology. For example, a tempo run for most of us coaches is your race pace for one hour. For Kipchoge, that would be ~4:24 per mile but he’s running his “tempo” long runs at an altitude converted 4:55-5:00 pace (5:00-5:10 at his altitude). So, he’s running much slower than his tempo pace. That’s why it’s very important to investigate what athletes/coaches mean when they use different terms for the same thing or the same term for different things, as in this case.

      In fact, at 4:55-5:00 pace, he’s running ~7% slower than his marathon pace for these long runs. To put it in more relative terms, that would be like a runner who runs his marathon at 7:00 per mile running his faster long runs at 7:31. Or for an 8:00 pace marathoner, a 8:35 pace or a 9:00 pace marathoner, 9:39 pace. In fact, the McMillan calculator puts his optimal long run pace at 5:10-6:13 so he’s not that much faster than his long run pace on these runs.

      My point is that I think for runners of non-elite speeds, you could probably do faster long runs (like fast finish long runs) for 2 hours at this faster pace. The issue is that you need to prepare for a longer (duration) run than he does. So, I don’t actually find his training that much different in concept. He’s just training for a different event, meaning he’s preparing to run as fast as he can for 2 hours and we are preparing to run as fast as we can for 3, 4, 5, 6 hours.

      I’ll add that when I was working for a coach of elite African runners (when Paul Tergat was the World Record Holder), they were actually doing a lot of slow (for them) long runs for extended periods of time early in their training cycle. Tergat, for example, built up to 3 hours for his long runs and they were done a very easy pace. Later in the plan, which is the data most refer to in Kipchoge’s training, the long runs were more like Kipchoge’s. So, again, I think a full understanding of the relativeness of his training is important because the terminology can be confusing.

      • I was also reading up on Kipchoge’s training plan before his last Berlin Marathon. I was thinking that he was training differently because of years of training he had done since childhood. (I have been to Kenya and seen little kids run miles to school, barefoot.) Your article above made it clear that their training is not too different from ours (but faster and more intense on hard days). Thank you for clarifying it.

  • Hi Greg, I’m training for Boston Marathon 2019. There are workouts like “2M w/u, 8 x (400m on 5%-uphill @ 10K race pace, 45″jog, 400m on 5%-downhill @ Marathon goal pace, 90″jog), 2M c/d” in my training plan. For my current fitness level 10K race pace is 03:50-03:59 min/km, Marathon goal pace is 04:15min/km. Should I try to run uphill at 03:50 min/km pace (honestly I’m unable to do it :)? Or it means “at 10K race EFFORT” (for me it corresponds to 04:30 min/km pace)? The same question about downhill pace: should it be equal to marathon goal pace (04:15min/km) or I should run downhill faster by 5% * 5 sec/km, i.e. at 03:50 min/km pace?

    • Great. I have the same pace and the same question!

    • Greg McMillan
      January 22, 2019 7:20 am

      In my opinion, uphill repeats should be run by effort and not an exact pace. (If you are a member of Run Team, I have a video in the Resources on effort-based vs pace-based workouts.) I prefer athletes to run in a way that “feels like” a 5K, for example, because, at least on outdoor hills, the incline, surface, weather, etc. can vary so much, I prefer to focus on the intensity and not force a specific pace. For example, I would tell a runner who was doing 8 uphill repeats that the first couple should feel like the first mile of a 5K – fast but controlled. The second 2-3 repeats should feel like the 2nd mile of a 5K – getting harder, requiring more focus to use good form. And the last 2-3 repeats are like the last mile – very hard, lots of mental challenge and near all-out breathing.

      For downhill, I think you can prescribe more by pace but again, I think effort should still be the primary metric the runner is using. For example, if the downhill repeat is to be run at marathon pace, yet the runner is feeling like that pace for that decline is really beating them up too much, then they should back off and run at an effort where the legs are challenged but not overstressed. I know this is more finesse that we like since we always want firm numbers for pacing but a big part of training is learning effort. So, my advice is to adjust your workout to run more by effort and see what the paces end up to be. Don’t overtrain the body by forcing it to a pace that is inappropriate.

  • I am currently training for Boston by running an interval workout on Tuesdays, tempo run on Thursdays, and long run on Saturdays. My plan is low mileage due to a recent injury, and I’m scheduling in cross training and strength workouts. What is the best day of the week for me to perform a high-stress strength workout?

    • Greg McMillan
      January 24, 2019 6:33 am

      That is a good question. I would suggest doing it on Thursday evening as a start and then see how your body reacts. You would not want to be compromised on your Saturday long run. Sunday (evening to allow recovery from the long) is another option. The key is to make sure you never compromise the quality of your key running sessions. It may take some experimentation to find the sequence that works best.

  • WEBINAR POLL:

    Finding the optimal fueling strategy for long races can be tough but I think seeing what others use can help in the quest for the perfect fueling plan. For this poll, let’s concentrate on what you use DURING the race. (I’ll do another poll on your favorite pre-race meal.) Give as much detail as you can with the products, preparation, timing, amount, transport, caveats, etc.

    Please click the orange “reply” link below to post your answer within my post so all answers will be stacked together.

    • Darius Draksas
      February 13, 2019 1:03 am

      I did my first marathon without any extra fueling, after some 33-34km it started to be hard. Now i am preparing for my second marathon, had 20km race recently, had some cashew nuts at km 8 and at km 13 and dried pineapples at km 18 (on the downhill). This backfired badly, i lost my pace and rhythm. Kilometer 19 was very hard, but then last kilometer felt good again. I think 20k is just too short for extra feeding, did for marathon preparation. Strange thing is that during long runs this feeding strategy works perfectly, probably due to pace difference 4:30min/km in comparison to 5:30min/km. Now i am rethinking what should i do for marathon, i do not want to carry like 8 gels, the pocket is to small.

    • My Marathon Race Day nutrition is shown below. During last couple of “rehearsal” long runs I dial in specific nutritional/brand choices based on what is going to be offered on course so there will be no surprises with taste or GI-digestion, etc.

      Breakfast as usual – bagel, coffee, sports drinks (sip)
      Start Village – “energy” bar, sports drink (sip), 1 gel
      On Course – carrying 5 gels on elastic “gel belt” – consume 1 gel/5mi with aid station water (5, 10, 15, 20 — w/one spare); sports drink (sip/cup) every other aid station (miles 1, 2, 3, 4, (5-gel/H20), 6, 7, etc…..

    • Until recently I’ve been carrying Nuun electrolyte drinks with me on long runs but I’ll be changing over to Gatoraide Endurance for my long runs to condition myself in prep for the same that will be provided on course at Boston. I have a FuelBelt that allows me to carry two 6 oz bottles as well as a pouch for 2-3 gel packs. I use GU gel packs because I like the taste and find them easy to digest. I’m a 5’4″ 115 lb female – I am still experimenting with how many gel packs work best for me – I think I’ve been too conservative on past runs (1 – 2 gels between miles 7 and 15) and may need to increase and spread it out more. I often times feel I need more liquids by the end of the run but my 2 bottles are finished. I don’t really want to buy another FuelBelt and have adequately relied on course-provided Gatoraide in my past 2 marathons without any issue. I suspect I’ll do the same at Boston. I tried the UCAN drink but honestly found it gross and chalky, reminiscent of my kids syrupy Motrin cough medicine. I like the UCAN bars as a snack pre-race but found them too heavy to eat on course. I usually have overnight oats (oats, almond butter, almond milk, maple syrup, chia seeds, banana) as my morning pre-race meal, and coffee of course!

    • I am an early adopter of Generation Ucan Superstarch and have used it for more than 10 years in more than 20 marathons. Prior to using it I used to get a lot of GI issues from other sports drinks and gels. I have fine tuned the way I use it for how it works best for me. I find I tolerate it better by sipping, rather than taking it all at once. My approach is to use 1 x25 gram shot 2 hours prior to the race (along with some oatmeal with a tbsp of peanut butter). In the last 15 min pre-race I will use another shot in 12 oz of water. I then hand carry 1 shot in a 10 oz bottle which I will sip over the first 10-12 km and then throw it away. I also use a fuel belt with 2 x 10 oz bottles, 1 is mixed with 2 shots of Superstarch which I will sip this over the next 15 km. The second bottle has water which I have for the latter part of the race if needed. I carry 3 Honey Stinger gels for emergencies, to be mixed with the water, but have not required them with my nutrition approach. I feel a key to fuelling is encouraging the body to become more fat adapted by an appropriate diet as well as adding some fasted long runs and training with Ucan as well. My race simulation runs will use the same strategy as when I will be racing. I ran a 2:56 marathon (at age 60) with this approach.
      Wayne

  • Hi Greg, I am coming over from Australia to experience my first Boston Marathon. I am trying to find out about drinks on the course. Can I provide my own? It looks like Gatorade Endurance Lemon Lime is available on course but how is it supplied (cup/satchel), so I can practice taking it on my long runs. For interest my marathon fuelling plan is to alternate between sports drink and gel about every 4-5km (2-3 miles)

  • I too am travelling from Australia for my first Boston marathon Pieter – good luck! For race fuelling I like to get up 3 hours or so before the race and enjoy grazing on a breakfast of carb-rich snacks, then during the race I find consuming 1 energy gel (~25g carbohydrate in each gel) every 30 mins works best for me. I read somewhere that you should try to consume approx 0.7g-1g of carbohydrate per kg of your body weight per hour – I’m 65kg so I need approximately 45g-65g of carbohydrate per hour). That being said I’m a big advocate for testing in training to see how you specifically handle different brands and flavours of gels and the level of consumption you feel your best at. On race day I try to consume each energy gel when there’s a drink station in sight (if possible) so that I can immediately wash the gel down with water/electrolyte for quicker delivery to the stomach and to moisten my mouth after consuming the fairly thick-textured gel. I alternate water and electrolyte at each drink station, unless it’s a warmer day, in which case I’ll up my electrolyte to water ratio. By the end of the marathon, having already consumed 5-6 gels, I’m usually battling trying to stomach yet another energy gel before the finish line, as I usual have sweet-tasting gel overload in the last 5-10kms, but I try to remember that my body needs the energy (probably the most) in the later stages of the race. Everyone is different so test and learn and see what works for you. I hope this helps. Good luck with your Boston training and race everyone!

  • Question : in the February 12th webinar you mentioned a resource/article about fading at the end of long runs but I couldn’t find that. On some of my longer runs (most recently an 18 miler) it seemed like everything hurt in the final few miles (my hips, back, hamstrings, etc.) and it was a struggle to finish. I’d love to read about how to combat that feeling and help with the finishes of those longer runs so it doesn’t feel like such hell. Thanks

  • Hi Greg,

    Thank you for the webinars and articles. When do you recommended running your final fast finish long run? From the training plans you highlighted it looks like your athletes are doing their last FF long runs 14 days before the marathon. This is my 3rd Boston and I’ve done similar hard effort long runs including marathon pace before, but even-so I don’t know if 2 weeks before the marathon is enough recovery time for me after such a hard effort. I was thinking of doing my FF long runs 3 weeks out, 5 weeks out and 7 weeks out. How does this plan sound?

    Thanks!

    • Yes. I find 14-21 days out for the last fast finish long run works well and then 1-2 more every other week before that. If you are worried about recovery, then definitely do it 3 weeks and not 2 weeks out.

  • I’ve sustained a moderate Achilles Tendonopathy injury after a race this past weekend, right as I’m headed into this peak training upcoming over the next 4 weeks. Seeing as I may miss the next 2-3weeks of solid training, how do I modify the plan after I return to running? Obviously, just being able to finish healthy is now the goal!

    • Sorry to hear about your injury. I’ve been having IT band issues for a few weeks, and am also feeling a bit of stress about the clock ticking away. I’ve never had the problem before, and think I overdid it on the hills (it’s particularly bad on the downhills – not good!). I like your “finish healthy” mantra. I’ll try to stick to that, though I am anxious to get back at the hills. Good luck!

    • I’m sorry to hear. First, get guidance from your therapist as they will have a good idea of how much load the tendon can tolerate. Then, be very, very gentle in the return to running. In your case, you just want to build toward the race and not worry about chasing fitness to get race-ready.

  • I’m sorry to hear. First, get guidance from your therapist as they will have a good idea of how much load the tendon can tolerate. Then, be very, very gentle in the return to running. In your case, you just want to build toward the race and not worry about chasing fitness to get race-ready.

  • Hi Greg,

    Thank you for a delightful, informative and inspiring conversation with Amby Burfoot. You touched on so many important and relevant issues, all the time weaving in those very special considerations for what is a unique experience – the Boston Marathon. I take heart, even though my qualifying time was not enough to get me into what would have been my seventh consecutive Boston Marathon for 2019, as I already know that I’ll be qualified for the 2020 event, and I can’t wait, never mind that there is 5 feet of snow everywhere I look around here, in Quebec. Many thanks to both you and Amby, and continued success to you both.

    Ian

  • No question here, so I hope you will accept my comment here. But in response to the Webinar with Amby Burfoot, I do have a couple of comments. First, in reference to last year’s Boston Marathon it was not simply cold, wind or rain…it was from my experience…horrendous. It was rain from the start…varying in intensity, but the worst was in the Newton Hills and even the last 10k to the finish. Those I remember quite vividly with these waves of torrential, driving rain could not see 10-ft in front of me (but I wear glasses). At some point in tail end of Newton Hills probably up Heartbreak in a wave of torrential rain I looked up and raised my middle finger and gave and “FU” and shouted it also to that sky. And even out of the hills and heading Brookline and onward…those waves of torrential downpours continued. And Amby mentions his concern about hypothermia and I passed 24-mi marker and it wasn’t too much further came to an uncontrollable shivering that really couldn’t run and I saw a tent and some police in high-viz vests and veered into it. Turns out it was medical tent and my best approximation it was ca 24.2-mi or 2-mi to go. Amby speaks of the “streak” and he doing 50th, and I simply trying to finish 10th consecutive. Had difficulty with speech, but made it clear to those medical personnel l needed to get back out there and finish with an official time. And they did their job and gave me a dry shirt, and I had them tape a mylar sheet around me, then the put a cheap plastic poncho over me and off I went, but all I did was try to fast-walk those last 2-mi, still in some waves of driving rain. Spent 1hr 13min in that medical tent and whatever it took me to try to fast-walk, then slog/run the last 1/3 mi down Boylston to the finish. And a finish time of 5:33 something. Not impressive FT…but a finish nonetheless. Some fared pretty well and ran some good race times in that 2018 Boston, but I think those that were in the farther back waves…incurred far harder rain/wind conditions. But it just wasn’t a simple factor of wind and cold temps and rain….it was a big part of it!

    • My comment gets posted as anonymous….but I am David Mauger (aka Frogger) and I ran that 2018 Boston Marathon that was supposed to be my glorious 10th straight, and in horrendous conditions that I was doing quite well to just past that 24-mi marker when hypothermia prevailed. To me…it was not about speed, but simply finishing what my goal was to run 10-straight Boston Marathons. Just so you know, my FT at Boston doesn’t get me in for #11, so about 2-weeks later I run Illinois Marathon to get that minimum QT gets me in for 2011….which was 4:05:13. Then of course BAA changes there min QT standards and now at age 65 I have to try to run a 4:05 or less if I hope to go back. Sorta “tightening the screws down” after 10-years of trying to be good enough to qualify and re-qualify. But Boston Marathon is the greatest race in the world…and it is why I want to keep going back!

  • Hey Greg,
    Dr. Freddie So here training with you again for my 15th straight Boston.
    This will be the toughest for me as I didn’t run (did bike hard) from Sept-Dec to heal from Achilles tendonitis. Started running on treadmill from Christmas to now (3 runs per week – Tempo, Hills, Long + 2 bikes) but strained my L Hamstring (4/10 pain) on hill repeats on treadmill recently. Been 9 days and have done lots of therapy – Chiro adjs, ART, Deep tissue, Acu, Graston and it’s getting better slowly. Still can only get to Marathon Pace before it strains a bit.

    With only 7 weeks left and little base mileage or speed, I’m concerned about what to do to get training in but not reinjure. A repeat sub 3:00 is out the window, so just want to requalify again (3:20).
    Should I keep intensity down (no hills) and just do long easy?
    I was thinking of maybe planning a run/walk 10/1 method during the race which I have never done (except when bonked 🙂 but have heard can work (Galloway). If so, how do I implement that in training – break up long run into 10′ intervals?

    Thanks for your help.

    • I’m so sorry to hear of the issues. It sounds like the best plan is to keep the intensity low and simply focus on endurance for this year’s Boston. Avoid anything that causes the aches/pains and spend the next 3-4 weeks just running consistently. Advance your long runs in a smart way and take a down week every 3-4 weeks to give the body time to rest. I’d think the main goal is just to be ready for the distance and if you are healthy going into the race, you have a good shot at 3:20 since your normal shape is sub 3.

      • Thanks Greg. Any thoughts on using the 10/1 or walk every aid station strategy during the race (even early in the race) as a preventive/pacing method vs using it when it’s too late? Or do you prefer running straight through on race day by taking a very conservative, negative split approach when decreased training or injury is in the picture?
        Since my original post, I was able to get 2:15 Easy Long run on TM (with 1-3′ breaks at 1:00 and 2:00) in with final paces getting close to Marathon Pace for 2nd hour until hammy started tightening up. Good progress at least 10 days post injury. Thanks for the help.

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